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Bangka/Lembeh 2024


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I just wanted to share some pictures of my recent and first ever trip to Bangka and Lembeh! 

 

Equipment used was:

Nikon Z8 + Nikon Z 105mm Macro

Seacam Housing and Strobes plus Retra Snoot

NZ8_2037.jpg

NZ8_1789.jpg

NZ8_3792.jpg

NZ8_3814-Bearbeitet.jpg

NZ8_4708.jpg

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Thank you very much!

 

@Miles Below: It was my first trip to Sulawesi, but I liked the diversity of Bangka very much and will go there again! We did only one dive at Sahaun due to bad conditions with a heavy swell even at 15 - 18 meters (nightmare for photographers!), but it is an incredible dive site for sure! Very healthy corals!

 

@Buddha: Those picture were shot at a shutter speed of 1/8 and a little movement of the camera.

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WOW! Superb images 👏👏👏 What was the technique behind the blurred in motion ones? You moving camera with front curtain? Or moving the other way with rear curtain? Or how? 🙂

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10 hours ago, RomiK said:

WOW! Superb images 👏👏👏 What was the technique behind the blurred in motion ones? You moving camera with front curtain? Or moving the other way with rear curtain? Or how? 🙂

Thank you!

 

Those shots were taken on front curtain sync and a slight move of the camera during exposure. 

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Posted (edited)

Thank you! 😊

The hairy frogfish was shot with a blue colored focus light (WeeFine 2300) for the background and a snooted strobe (Retra Snoot on Seacam flash) on the frogfish. 

Edited by ChrisH
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12 hours ago, Michael said:

Danke 🙂
 

so you need really low power on the strobe then i guess? 

No, actually not. I don‘t remember the strobe setting, but the picture was taken at f14, ISO80, so the strobe still needs some power. 
You just adjust the exposure to the amount of light you want from the blue light. After that is set, you can dial in the required strobe power. You can go very low on shutter speed to let more light from the focus light in. The strobe will freeze the subject anyway. As I had set the shutter speed to 1/60 for this picture (so not really low), I think it was a very cloudy day with rather low visibility. This helps blocking the natural light so it doesnt overpower the artificial blue light. 

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